Steady Shot Press

Student Invention Aims to Improve Control for Diabetics on MDI

Steady Shot For Pen Needles was featured by Insulin Nation and other media outlets in an article. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
Steady Shot, a small plastic device that attaches to pen needles, makes site rotation easier for diabetics on multiple daily injections

 

To read the Insulin Nation Article, Click Here

 

The Cap Times Steady Shot

The Cap Times Steady Shot
 
When Shawn Michels was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 16, his doctor told him to regularly switch where he was injecting insulin.

 

To read the article by The Cap Times, Click Here

Milwaukee startup Steady Shot aims to ease the pain of insulin shots

 Steady Shot Insulin Injection Sites Wisconsin Inno

A Milwaukee-based startup focused on easing the pain of daily insulin shots recently celebrated its best sales month...
 
To read the article by Wisconsin Inno, Click Here

Savvy Diabetic Steady Shot 

Steady Shot For Pen Needles on Savvy Diabetic
 
Student Invention Aims to Improve Control for Diabetics on MDI was reported by
Sara Seitz for InsulinNation.com

 

To read the article by Savvy Diabetic, Click Here

 

Steady Shot To Launch Feb 1.

Steady Shot For Pen Needles was featured by NBC 15 Madison. Invention for insulin administration to make blood sugar better.
 
After a new way to give yourself an injection through the Steady Shot, on Monday the device got a closer look.
 
Both the founder and CEO, Shawn Michels and Abram Becker from the Discovery to Product Program at the UW are here for January's Local Business Spotlight.

 

To read the article by NBC 15, Click Here

 

UW-Madison grad invents medical device for diabetics

 
A recent UW-Madison graduate's injection invention is making waves in the medical field.
 
It’s a device designed for diabetics by Shawn Michels. He graduated from UW-Madison’s School of Business in 2018. He’s now an inventor after creating Steady Shot, a medical device that helps diabetics like himself with a common problem

 

To read the article by NBC 15, Click Here

 

Invention is an insulin innovation

UW-Madison student changes diabetic lives with invention to safely and easily inject insulin. For insulin pen needles.
 
A University of Wisconsin–Madison alumnus is now selling a patented device to help people with diabetes safely and easily inject insulin

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To read the article by WiscNews, Click Here

 

Invention could help diabetics with safer, surer insulin injections

Type 1 and type 2 diabetics inject insulin to manage blood sugar levels. They can reduce phobia and anxiety of needles.
 
Millions of diabetics around the world, both Type 1 and Type 2, have likely injected insulin billions of times into the easily accessible stomach and thighs. And many of them experience the side effect that bothered Michels — scarring and bruising — to some degree.

 

To read the article by Wisc News, Click Here

 

D2P project becomes career for graduating UW–Madison undergraduate

Steady Shot for Pen Needles wins grant funding at a UW-Madison business plan competition to help improve life for diabetics.
 
When Shawn Michels’ took the class Intro to Entrepreneurship, Jon Eckhardt, associate professor of management and human resources and executive director of the Weinert Center for Entrepreneurship, assigned a project to develop a new product. The advice Echhardt gave his class was, “Focus on problems that you have personally.”

 

To read about Steady Shot's background, Click Here

 

 

Steady Shot In gBETA

Steady Shot For Pen Needles Gbeta

Steady Shot participated in Gener8tor's Gbeta program in the spring of 2019. 

 

To view their other portfolio companies, Click Here

 

Steady Shot On The Health & Wellness Blog

Steady Shot helps promote diabetes health and wellness

 

To read the article, Click Here

 

Steady Shot On WPR

 Steady Shot Diabetes Wisconsin Public Radio
 
Steady Shot is a patented insulin injection aid that makes injecting insulin, rotating injection sites, and injecting while traveling easy and comfortable. 

To read the article by WPR, Click Here